A Belief that Changes the World

First you must believe that you are already within the Way.  You must believe that you are free of delusion, illusory thoughts, confused ideas, increase, and decrease and mistaken understanding.  Believe in this manner, clarify the Way and practice accordingly.  This is the essence of studying the Way.

Loss is Gain

Sawaki Kodo Roshi, a 20th century Japanese Zen Master, talked about Zen as the “Study of loss.”  What I like about this is how unappealing this sounds on the surface.  In a culture that values unending growth and gain, who wants to study about loss?  Kodo Roshi, in fact, says in Japanese, “Son wa toku, toku wa son” =  “Loss is gain and gain is loss.”

Saving All Sentient Beings without Becoming a Superhero

I grew up watching TV shows and movies that portrayed superheroes like Luke Skywalker and Yoda defeating supervillains like Darth Vader.  I’m still attracted to these kinds of movies, but I also know that we don’t need to be super-human, saintly, or even to become a Buddha to be of service to others or to save the world.

“Improving” Zazen with Yoga

Sometimes people make the mistake of thinking meditation is going to do something for them, make them calmer or happier. There has been loads of research on how meditation does that.  But without adequate preparation it really just gets us in touch with our own misery.  This is why I suggest asking not what your meditation practice can do for you, but what you can do for your meditation practice.

For Hundreds of Thousands of Years, the Stew in the Pot Has Boiled up a Resentment Very Hard to Level

The contents of this lecture are difficult and challenging to many if not all of us. The point of this article is not to shame people for eating meat, nor to make people become vegan, but to offer encouragement to lessen meat consumption – even by one meal a week or month – and to draw awareness to the intimate connection between the humane treatment of animals and the humane treatment of human beings.

My Spiritual Ancestors are Japanese, Chinese, and Indian

With the rise of recent hate crimes targeting the Asian American community I feel it necessary to share my love, appreciation and dedication to the people that have fed me spiritually for the last 30 years.  American Zen is indebted to countless Japanese Americans, Chinese-Americans, Korean-Americans, Tibetan-Americans and Indian-Americans who have over the past two centuries brought with them the spiritual teachings from their lands of origin.